saveblackfish:

There is nothing quite like the colours in Active Pass. Here is a shot of J14 “Samish” entering the pass.  #killerwhale #killerwhales #whale #whales #westcoast #whalewatching #wildwhalesvan #orca #orcas #oh_canada_ #explorebc #emptythetanks #explorevancouver #hellobc #acticepass #emeraldsea #gulfislands #green #nature #bc #blackfish #beautifulbritishcolumbia #jpod #southernresidents #instanature # by gary_j27 http://ift.tt/XHDHSH

saveblackfish:

There is nothing quite like the colours in Active Pass. Here is a shot of J14 “Samish” entering the pass.
#killerwhale #killerwhales #whale #whales #westcoast #whalewatching #wildwhalesvan #orca #orcas #oh_canada_ #explorebc #emptythetanks #explorevancouver #hellobc #acticepass #emeraldsea #gulfislands #green #nature #bc #blackfish #beautifulbritishcolumbia #jpod #southernresidents #instanature # by gary_j27 http://ift.tt/XHDHSH

orcaobsessed:

Last week, Nalani turned 8 years old at SeaWorld Orlando. She was born to Katina and Taku on September 18, 2006. However, her story is quite abnormal… Nalani is SeaWorld’s first inbred killer whale; Katina and Taku mated, even though they were mother and son.

9 days after little Nalani was born, her 4-year-old brother/uncle, Ikaika, tried to mate with her. Her father/brother, Taku, was also aggressive with her. For some reason, Katina did not try to prevent these things from happening, as she seemed to favor her sons over her new daughter. In an attempt to resolve this issue, SeaWorld put nursing Katina, Ikaika, and Taku on benzodiazepines (drugs). Then Taku was shipped from Orlando to SeaWorld San Antonio and Ikaika (aged 4) was banished to Marineland Canada on a breeding loan.

The following year, Taku died prematurely at age 14 from West Nile Virus, which he contracted from a mosquito bite due to logging at the surface—something that would never occur naturally in the wild. After a legal battle between SeaWorld and Marineland, Ikaika was exported back to the U.S. in 2011, but instead of being reunited with his mom and siblings in Orlando, he was sent to San Diego, where he is currently held.

Katina and her 3-year-old son, Makaio, have recently been recorded mating. Additionally, little Makaio and his now 8-year-old inbred sister, Nalani, have also been witnessed mating. What will the future hold for this family?
•
Photo & Post: @seaslaverysucks

orcaobsessed:

Last week, Nalani turned 8 years old at SeaWorld Orlando. She was born to Katina and Taku on September 18, 2006. However, her story is quite abnormal… Nalani is SeaWorld’s first inbred killer whale; Katina and Taku mated, even though they were mother and son.

9 days after little Nalani was born, her 4-year-old brother/uncle, Ikaika, tried to mate with her. Her father/brother, Taku, was also aggressive with her. For some reason, Katina did not try to prevent these things from happening, as she seemed to favor her sons over her new daughter. In an attempt to resolve this issue, SeaWorld put nursing Katina, Ikaika, and Taku on benzodiazepines (drugs). Then Taku was shipped from Orlando to SeaWorld San Antonio and Ikaika (aged 4) was banished to Marineland Canada on a breeding loan.

The following year, Taku died prematurely at age 14 from West Nile Virus, which he contracted from a mosquito bite due to logging at the surface—something that would never occur naturally in the wild. After a legal battle between SeaWorld and Marineland, Ikaika was exported back to the U.S. in 2011, but instead of being reunited with his mom and siblings in Orlando, he was sent to San Diego, where he is currently held.

Katina and her 3-year-old son, Makaio, have recently been recorded mating. Additionally, little Makaio and his now 8-year-old inbred sister, Nalani, have also been witnessed mating. What will the future hold for this family?

Photo & Post: @seaslaverysucks

ugh no, keeping this a strictly cetacean/mainly orca blog. not engaging in stupid arguments with stupid people. nope, nope, nope, not going to even try

f this

stumpytheorca:

scottish-orca:

In this paper the north Atlantic populations are studied as a whole including Icelandic/Norway/Hebrides/Shetland/Greenland/Gibralta and North Sea.The Hebrides population (West Coast Community) and the Gibraltar population are noted in this paper to be the smallest populations (critically small). These are the only two population that showed the greatest difference in eye patches to the rest of the North Atlantic.Otherwise it was determined there was no way to identify different matriarch lines or even populations in the North Atlantic by their eye patch or saddle (bar the Hebrides community). Which is different to the populations in the North Pacific where 90% of transients have a smooth saddle patch vs the fish eating populations where there is a wide variation.X

This is why I find the posts on captive orca saying ‘oh X looks so much like X!’ to be so very confusing. 
Zoom Info
stumpytheorca:

scottish-orca:

In this paper the north Atlantic populations are studied as a whole including Icelandic/Norway/Hebrides/Shetland/Greenland/Gibralta and North Sea.The Hebrides population (West Coast Community) and the Gibraltar population are noted in this paper to be the smallest populations (critically small). These are the only two population that showed the greatest difference in eye patches to the rest of the North Atlantic.Otherwise it was determined there was no way to identify different matriarch lines or even populations in the North Atlantic by their eye patch or saddle (bar the Hebrides community). Which is different to the populations in the North Pacific where 90% of transients have a smooth saddle patch vs the fish eating populations where there is a wide variation.X

This is why I find the posts on captive orca saying ‘oh X looks so much like X!’ to be so very confusing. 
Zoom Info

stumpytheorca:

scottish-orca:

In this paper the north Atlantic populations are studied as a whole including Icelandic/Norway/Hebrides/Shetland/Greenland/Gibralta and North Sea.

The Hebrides population (West Coast Community) and the Gibraltar population are noted in this paper to be the smallest populations (critically small). These are the only two population that showed the greatest difference in eye patches to the rest of the North Atlantic.

Otherwise it was determined there was no way to identify different matriarch lines or even populations in the North Atlantic by their eye patch or saddle (bar the Hebrides community). Which is different to the populations in the North Pacific where 90% of transients have a smooth saddle patch vs the fish eating populations where there is a wide variation.

X

This is why I find the posts on captive orca saying ‘oh X looks so much like X!’ to be so very confusing. 

orcaobsessed:

While SeaWorld continues to dig its heels in – pointing out that tens of thousands of visitors are in its parks right now – others are responding more progressively. In 2012 the National Aquarium in Baltimore, cancelled its performances. Since then visitors have been able to sit and watch the dolphins as they are simply taken care of by staff. Now, the aquarium is considering retiring their eight bottlenose dolphins altogether and is in talks to create the first ocean-side dolphin sanctuary in the US. Its decision was based on regular polling of visitors; it learned that people no longer felt comfortable with the show.

Others are following suit. This September, the Clearwater Aquarium in Florida announced it would also end animal shows, choosing to focus on rehabilitation and marine resources instead. When asked by the Guardian if SeaWorld would ever consider a similar move, the company said the terms “retire” and “sanctuary” are misplaced in the context of animal care. But added: “The short answer is no.”
.
However, even if there isn’t a future for such attractions in the west, many conservationists are concerned that the problem could move elsewhere.
“In other parts of the world, like China, the industry is growing exponentially. In the last 10 years we’ve seen around 50 aquaria opening up in China that have captive belugas, bottlenose dolphins and now they’re looking at orcas as well. So, while we’re making progress in one part of the world, things are not going so well in other places.”
.
In SW’s August second-quarter report, CEO Jim Atchison announced “significant progress in our plans to expand our theme parks outside the US”, and indicating that the company has signed a letter of intent to co-develop parks in Asia, India and Russia.
•
Source: “Marine park attractions: can they survive?” by The Guardian
Via @seaslaverysucks

orcaobsessed:

While SeaWorld continues to dig its heels in – pointing out that tens of thousands of visitors are in its parks right now – others are responding more progressively. In 2012 the National Aquarium in Baltimore, cancelled its performances. Since then visitors have been able to sit and watch the dolphins as they are simply taken care of by staff. Now, the aquarium is considering retiring their eight bottlenose dolphins altogether and is in talks to create the first ocean-side dolphin sanctuary in the US. Its decision was based on regular polling of visitors; it learned that people no longer felt comfortable with the show.

Others are following suit. This September, the Clearwater Aquarium in Florida announced it would also end animal shows, choosing to focus on rehabilitation and marine resources instead. When asked by the Guardian if SeaWorld would ever consider a similar move, the company said the terms “retire” and “sanctuary” are misplaced in the context of animal care. But added: “The short answer is no.”
.
However, even if there isn’t a future for such attractions in the west, many conservationists are concerned that the problem could move elsewhere.
“In other parts of the world, like China, the industry is growing exponentially. In the last 10 years we’ve seen around 50 aquaria opening up in China that have captive belugas, bottlenose dolphins and now they’re looking at orcas as well. So, while we’re making progress in one part of the world, things are not going so well in other places.”
.
In SW’s August second-quarter report, CEO Jim Atchison announced “significant progress in our plans to expand our theme parks outside the US”, and indicating that the company has signed a letter of intent to co-develop parks in Asia, India and Russia.

Source: “Marine park attractions: can they survive?” by The Guardian
Via @seaslaverysucks